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9th Grade Global

 
 

Global I - II

 
 Use the link below to check your grades.  If you have trouble signing in, email Ms. Johnson at backinblack@mindspring.com
 
 
 
Unit #1 - Methods of Social Studies/Early Man.  Topics Covered:
geography (continents, oceans & seas, major rivers, montains); types of maps - topographical (physical), political, economic; measurements of time; primary and secondary sources, perception of history (who told the story), latitude/longitude, role and methods of archaeologists, early man; Neolithic Revolution/development of civilizations.
 
 
 
Unit #2 -River Valley Civilizations (Extended Unit)
Topics Covered:
Ancient Sumerians (Mesopotaima/Fertile Crescent), Babylonians, Hebrews, Egyptians. Geography, political, economic, social, artistic and religious achievements.
 
 
 
Unit #3 - River Valley Civilizations - India
Topics covered:  Geography, pre-Aryan peoples, religins (Hinduism, Buddhism), dynasties, political, economic and social achievements.
 
 
Unit #4 - River Valley Civilizations - China
Topics Covered:  Geography, political, economic, social and artistic achievements. Dynasties, philosophies:  Legalism, Daoism, Confucianism. 
 
 
 
Unit #5 - Classical Greece
Topics Covered: Geography, cultural diffusion/interactions with peoples on the Mediterranean Sea, philosophy: Socrates, Plato, Aristotle. Government (democracy), political, economic, social and artistic achievements; Alexander the Great and the spread of Hellenism.
 
 
 Unit #6 - Ancient Rome /Christianity- Topics covered: 
 Geography, government (Senate and the Republic, including its influence on the United States of America), political, economic, social and artistic achievements. The message of Jesus.  Persecution of Christians under Roman rule.  The spread of Christianity.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Unit #7 - Byzantine Empire
Geography of the Byzantine Empire, the Great Schism between the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Roman Catholic Church, political (including Justinian's Code of Law), economic, social, scientific and artistic achievements.  Influence of Byzantium on Russia (religion, architecture, cyrillic alphabet).
 

 

 
Unit # 8 - Islam
Geography of the Middle East, beliefs of Islam, spread of Islam, varieties of Islam (Sunni, Shi'at), political, economic, social and artistic/scientific achievements.
 
 
 
Unit # 9 - Middle Ages (Medieval Times, Dark Ages)
Fall of Rome and decline of Western Civilization.  Rise of feudalism/manorialism.  Political, economic, social, artistic and scientific adhievements.  The Crusades and the Commerical Revolution.
 
 
Unit # 10 - The Renaissance and Reformation
Rise of City-States/Nations.  The rebirth of Greek and Roman ideas during the Renaissance.  Political, exonomic, social, scientific and artistic achievements.  Martin Luther and the Protestant Reformation.  The spread of Protestantism - England and Henry VIII; Queen Elizathe I.  Religious wars.  Catholic Counter Reformation.  The Inquisition.
 
The "Mona Lisa"
 
 
 
 
 
Martin Luther nailing his 95 Theses to the door in Germany.  Beginning of the Protestant Reformation 
 
 
 
 Unit #11 - Pre-Columbian Civilizations:  Mayans, Aztecs, Incas.
Geography of South America, Central America, Mexico.  Political, economic, social, scientific and artistic achievements.
 
 
 

Course:                    Global History I, II

Instructor:                    Ms. Johnson

 

Welcome to Global I!

In this class we will become historians in our own right by interpreting the past through clues in books, original (primary source) writings, diaries and documents, and relics/artifacts that our ancestors left behind.  Where do we come from?  What were the earliest civilizations?  History is loaded with drama! Place your bets, ladies and gentlemen.  Who will conquer whom – the nomadic invaders or the settled peoples?  Which philosophy will the Chinese adopt to end the warring states – Daoism, Confucianism or Legalism? Will the Huns defeat the Romans?  How far will Islam spread?  Will the Mongols rule the world?  Will the Catholic Church determine the fate of rising nations?  How will science, exploration and cultural interaction change man’s view of his place in the universe?

Course Overview

Global History I - II, taken in the 9th grade, is the first of a two-course sequence designed to give students a foundation in world history from early man through the Age of Exloration. Students will continue their study of world history in the 10th grade (First Global Age- the present), and will take the New York State Global Regents Examination at the end of the 10th grade year. 
You will take a 3 hour final exam which covers all we have learned during the year in January and in June.  These exams have 50 multiple choice questions, a thematic essay and a DBQ essay.

Topics

Methods of the Social Sciences

Early Peoples; Neolithic Revolution and Early River Civilizations (Mesopotamia, Egypt, Indus Valley (India) , Yellow River Valley (China)

Classical Civilizations (China, Greece, India)

Rise and fall of great empires and dynasties (Alexander the Great, Rome, Byzantine Empire, China)

Emergence and Spread of Belief Systems (throughout the course) – Animism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Legalism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Shintoism

Islamic Civilization

Medieval Europe and Japan

Rise and Fall of the Mongols and their impact on Eurasia

Crusades/Commercial Revolution/end of feudalism and the feudal manor

The Renaissance and Humanism

Reformation and Counter Reformation

The Rise of European Nation States
Pre-Columbian American Civilizations - Mayans, Aztecs, Incas

African Civilizations and the impact of Islam

Age of Exploration/collision of Europeans/African slave trade/indigenous Native Americans

Key Skills to Develop:

Thinking

Identifying relevant factual materials

Drawing inferences and conclusions from data

Recognizing, creating, and testing hypotheses

Inference building: reinterpreting events in terms of what might have happened

Interpreting maps, charts, graphs, and visual images

Reading

Evaluating conflicting sources and interpretations

Detecting cause-and-effect relationships

Extracting specific information from broader context

Making connections, recognizing patterns, and identifying themes about world history from a broad variety of primary and secondary sources

Recognizing bias and stereotypes

Writing

Effective note-taking and outlining at home (homework) and in class

Essay writing – the five paragraph essay; mastering the thesis statement

historical thematic essay

historical Document Based Questions (DBQ) essay

essay outlining

Informal writing – idea gathering

Responsive/Creative writing – reacting to ideas; role play

Research Writing – books and internet methods, museum as research resource

Speaking

Oral presentations, debates, discussions, dramas
 
Websites
Powerpointpalooza.com has many of the power points we will use in class.  You will also be able to find the power points on this website - lomanyc.net (go to "staff"- click on "Johnson);  youtube.com - Google Lady Gaga and the French Revolution to find the historyteachers page.  This has many funny history videos set to pop music.
regentsprep.org - has multiple choice questions and answer explanations from past Regents exams, as well as examples of thematic and DBQ essays.

 

Course Requirements

  1. Three-ring binder(s) as term portfolio – students are required to keep an organized, chronological binder which will contain class notes, handouts, homework assignments, essays, group projects, and the term project.  Because we will use many handouts as supplements to the textbook, it is vital (and required) to have this type of notebook.  Binders will be evaluated and assigned a grade at the end of each unit (every 2-3 weeks).
  2. No late homework projects and essays will be accepted.  Late assignments will receive a “zero” grade.  Students who complete their homework excel on quizzes and exams. If you are absent, it is your responsibility to speak to me and to get your make-up work (after school).  Students who do not do homework and/or fail an exam will be required to come for after school tutoring.  All assignments and their corresponding grades will be posted on Skedula (Pupilpath).
**    Quizzes: No make-up quizzes unless you have a verified absent note. If you are
          late to class and miss the quiz, there will not be a make-up quiz.  Quizzes are
         usually at the beginning of class.

3.      Lateness and absences affect not only the late or absent student, but the whole class, because we all depend on each other’s insights and contributions to class discussions.  If you are late, you will be sent to the office to get a late pass.

4.      Organization and neatness is vital!  You must have a 3-ring binder to pass.

5.      **Class participation – there is a zero tolerance policy for disrupting the learning of other students.  If you decide to waste our time, you will be issued a pink slip.  If the disruption continues, you will be sent to the dean and your parent or guardian will be called.  If the behavior persists, your parent or guardian will be required to come to the school for a meeting.  The Global Regents exam next year is very difficult, and it is not fair for a student to harm another student’s ability to earn a high score on this test.

Required Materials

***Three ring-binder

Lined, white, three-hole college rule paper                

 Pens (blue or black ink)                                                         

Yellow highlighter                                         

Students are required to bring the above materials to class each day                 

Students will not be required to bring their textbooks to class.
 

Grading

*Tests:  50% - if you are absent on a test day you must bring a note in order to make-up the exam.

*Homework, Binder Portfolio: 30%
*Quizzes:    10%
*Class Participation: 10%
(this includes in-class behavior, attendance, being prepared for class with a pen, paper and binder, and getting to work immediately, participating in class discussions, checking Pupilpath, attending tutoring.
 
Film -You can receive extra credit when you watch and write a one page report about a film.  Don't write a summary about a film.  I am looking for an one page essay about what you have learned about the time period of the film - the events, of course, but also the culture, the fashion, government, etc.  Listed below are some suggestions.  If you have another film choice, clear it with me first. 
Troy - ancient Greeks battle the city-state of Troy (based on the book The Illiad).
The Odyssey - The Greeks' journey back from the battle of Troy (mythology).
Alexander the Great  - Alexander hellenizes the world on his great journey of conquest.
Spartacus - (must be the original starring Kurt Douglas) - true story of Spartacus, the gladiator who led a slave revolt during the Roman Empire
Attila the Hun - the barbarian or great leader (depending on one's view of history) who conquered a large part of the world.
Kingdom of Heaven - the Crusades during Medieval Times
The Name of the Rose - One of my favorite murder mysteries.  It is set in a medieval monastery.
Ivan Ho - Medieval adventure set in Merry Old England during the Middle Ages.
Romeo and Juliette - Renaissance tragedy of two young lovers.
Luther - excellent movie about the Protestant Reformation
Elizabeth - make sure it stars Cate Blanchett.  Story of Queen Elizabeth I, daugher of English monarch Henry VIII.
The Prophet - epic about the rise of Islam
Apocalypto - Mayan and Aztec epic of conquest and human sacrifice.

 

Tutoring – Tutoring is available Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 3:-3:45 in room 399-b. Tutoring will be required if I request that you attend.  Failure to report to tutoring will result in a call to your parent or guardian.

 
Classroom Rules: 
There is one golden rule:  Don't disrupt the learning of others nor yourself.  Many things fall under this rule:   

Non-Negotiable items:

No cell phone, i-pod, texting.  If you are caught using any of these devices, you must surrender it/them immediately.  No discussion.  It will be returned at the end of class.  Resistance to surrendering your electronic device will result in it being taken by someone from the front office and your parent/guardian will need to come in to retrieve it.
 
Bathroom - There is no bathroom pass.  We have too much to do in Global. Please go to the bathroom before class - especially on days whenwe meet after lunch (budget time during your lunch break to go to the bathroom).  NO EXCEPTIONS.
 
Don't interrupt the lesson by talking, "pounding" or asking for pencil/paper.

 

Seating – if you are asked to change your seat, you must.  There is to be no discussion.  Any time wasted debating this issue will result in a visit to the dean’s office and a pink slip.

 

Food – no food/sodas are allowed in the classroom.  Bottled water is encouraged.
 
Clear Desk/Lap - all handbags, backpacks, etc. must be hung from your chair-back, put in the basket under your desk or set on the floor next to your desk.  Nothing is allowed to be on your lap or desktop. This will prevent the temptation of texting, putting on lotion, etc.,  and will allow you to focus on the lesson.  No discussion.
 
Global is hard work, but we will have a rewarding and fun time together if we stay focused and follow the rules!  Right now everyone has an "A" - let's keep it that way!  I arrive at school early every day, and if you need anything, I am here for you!  Be good to yourself and do your best!
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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